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If you own, purchase or upgrade to Novell Open Enterprise Server, you can download the self-study kit for our five-day Integrating Novell Open Enterprise Server for Linux course, absolutely FREE until June 30! You may also purchase a hard copy of the kit for US$75—an 85 percent discount! For details, visit novell.com/products/openenterpriseserver/support_and_training.html.

This article is the third in a three-part series aimed to acquaint you with Novell Open Enterprise Server and perhaps ease some of the anxiety you're feeling about making the jump from NetWare. The content is taken from the Novell training course Integrating Novell Open Enterprise Server for Linux.

Are you convinced yet that it's time to give Linux a try? I'll assume that you're not, and it's my job in Part 3 of this series to give you that last little nudge. In Parts 1 and 2 of this series you were introduced to a few of the more interesting benefits and features of Novell Open Enterprise Server for Linux. In Part 3, I introduce you to two more features. Go ahead and install Novell Open Enterprise Server for Linux so you can see it work. Then take a look at Integrating Novell Open Enterprise Server for Linux, Course 3077.

In Part 1, you were shown that your NetWare experience gives you a nice head start on conquering the Linux learning curve. You already know the Web-based tools you use to manage Novell services on Linux: iManager, iMonitor and Remote Manager. And with a little practice you can become as familiar with the command line in Linux as you are with the system console on NetWare.

In Part 2, you were shown how straightforward storage services and file sharing are on Linux. You were shown that NCP (the client and file access protocol you know and love) and Novell Storage Services are alive and well on Novell Open Enterprise Server for Linux.

In Part 3, I cover the following:

  • Migrating iPrint from NetWare to Open Enterprise Server Linux

  • Installing and configuring iFolder 3.2 on an Open Enterprise Server Linux server

> Migrate iPrint Printers from NetWare to Novell Open Enterprise Server for Linux
Would you believe you can migrate your iPrint configuration from NetWare to Novell Open Enterprise Server for Linux without your users knowing anything has changed? Imagine migrating a service from one platform to another and when your users come back to work the next morning, they continue to do what they always do, and they don't notice anything different.

I'll show how you can use this scenario with your own iPrint print managers and printer agents. After some preparation and planning, you can take a few minutes to run an iPrint migration and be ready for your users when they come back to work. They won't notice anything has changed, because the printer has the same name and the same features it's always had. Only you will know that the iPrint service is running on Open Enterprise Server for Linux instead of NetWare. And you will know that you are taking advantage of the lower-cost hardware and software that Linux affords. You can also use this migration as an opportunity to consolidate print managers and servers, and optimize your iPrint configuration.

The trick to pulling off such a migration is to implement DNS naming of your printers. This has been a recommended practice for a long time, but if you haven't done it in your network yet, consider doing it as a best practice. All you have to do is create an A record for the printer, then load the printer's Print Manager with the DNSNAME switch. For example, at the server console prompt, enter

ndpsm .printmgr.slc.da /dnsname=printer_name.da.com

After you change from using IP addresses to DNS names for your printers, your users have to reinstall their printers—only once—so their iPrint clients are made aware of the printers' DNS names. This might cause some initial confusion and help desk calls, but it is worth it in the long run. Using DNS names for your printers gives you the flexibility to change your printer configuration on the back end without your users having to reinstall their printers every time you change the iPrint system configuration.

Imagine migrating a service from one platform to another and when your users come back to work the next morning, they continue to do what they always do, and they don't notice anything different.

The iPrint migration is simply a process of migrating Printer Agents from a source server to a target server. You can either migrate a Print Manager from a source server to a target server, and all its Printer Agents are migrated along with it,or you can create a new Print Manager on the target server and selectively migrate just the Printer Agents you want.

When you are migrating Printer Agents from NetWare servers to Novell Open Enterprise Server for Linux servers, first create an iPrint Driver Store (IDS) object on the Open Enterprise Server for Linux server. The Print Manager (either the one you migrate or the new one you create) must be assigned to this IDS. The IDS on an Open Enterprise Server for Linux server is equivalent to a Print Broker on a NetWare server. As part of the migration, print drivers stored in the NetWare Print Broker's Resource Management Service (RMS) are migrated to the Open Enterprise Server for Linux IDS (as implied by the name Driver Store).

Besides creating a Driver Store on the Open Enterprise Server for Linux server, you must prepare your Windows workstation by installing the Server Consolidation Utility and the latest iPrint client. Next, prepare your tree by creating the container to which you want to migrate the Printer Agents. You can migrate within the same tree but you can't migrate Printer Agents within the same container. So make sure the Printer Agents are being moved to a different container from the one where they currently reside. You can also migrate Printer Agents from one tree to another if you have sufficient rights to both trees.

After you've done that, you're ready to start a project in the Server Consolidation Utility. When the project starts, you get a GUI that lets you model your migration project. Herein you can drag and drop Print Managers or Printer Agents from the container in the source tree to the container in the destination tree. (See Figure 1.)

Before proceeding with the migration, use the Server Consolidation Utility to verify that everything is in order and the migration will succeed.


> Install and Configure iFolder 3.2 on an Open Enterprise Server for Linux Server
You might not have heard of iFolder 3.2 yet. That's because it is new with Novell Open Enterprise Server SP 2. (iFolder 3.2 was not included in the original shipping version nor with SP1.) If you have heard of iFolder 3.2, you probably know that it only installs on an Open Enterprise Server for Linux server. If you haven't yet implemented iFolder for your users, the features in this version might be just what it takes to convince you to take the plunge. Of course, taking the plunge with iFolder 3.2 also means taking the plunge with Novell Open Enterprise Server for Linux.

I'm not simply using shameless marketing talk to get you to start using Open Enterprise Server for Linux. As a courseware developer, I've been working with iFolder since the first version was released with NetWare 6. I've been writing iFolder content and hands-on exercises with each new version since then. Novell implemented iFolder internally while it was still in beta, and I was one of the first to use it and teach it to my co-workers. I have always been a fan of this product. But the first time I looked at iFolder 3.2, during the development of Course 3077, my jaw actually dropped.

I was impressed not only with how easy it is to install, but also with how simple and powerful it is for the users.

Through the end of June 2007, Novell is offering a free download of the Course 3077 self-study kit for customers who own, purchase or upgrade to Novell Open Enterprise Server.

You install iFolder 3.2 with the YaST tool on the Open Enterprise Server for Linux server desktop. Once installed, manage the iFolder 3.2 system through iManager. From the iFolder 3.2 module in iManager, select the System task and you are on your way to enabling your users for iFolder. From the System page, select the LDAP tab and you'll see the dialog shown in Figure 2. (See Figure 2.)

Now just search for and select users, groups or containers to populate your iFolder user roster. Select the Update and Synchronize button at the bottom of the page and that's it! Your users can now access and use iFolder 3.2.

Your users will like iFolder 3.2 because of the control and flexibility it allows them. After the client is installed, users set up their own account. From there they can:

  • manage the preferences that you allow or disallow them
  • add a folder from their workstation to their iFolder account by simply rightclicking the folder and selecting Convert to an iFolder. This means that users can have several iFolders on their workstation and they are all synchronized to the iFolder server
  • know that the files in their iFolders are always backed up to the iFolder server
  • share their iFolders with other users in the iFolder system. And as owner of the iFolders they are sharing, they can determine whether others users will have Full Control, Read/Write or Read Only access
  • always access the latest versions of their files in their iFolders from anywhere, anytime and from any machine that has an iFolder client on it
  • access files in their iFolders through a Web browser on a machine that has no iFolder client. (This is only possible if you've also installed iFolder 3.2 Web Access, which is as easy to install as iFolder 3.2 and requires no additional configuration for users.)

While earlier versions of iFolder have been compelling, iFolder 3.2 is truly worth your time to set up and play with in a test environment. After you've seen how useful it is to you, try rolling it out into production on your network. Once users have started using it and relying on it, just try taking it away from them!

> Where Do I Go From Here?
If you're anxious to get started and want some materials to help guide you through what we've been talking about, consider taking an available Course 3077 class or purchase a self-study kit.

And, through the end of June 2007, Novell is offering a free download of the Course 3077 self-study kit for customers who own, purchase or upgrade to Novell Open Enterprise Server. The same customers can also purchase a hard copy of the kit for US$75—an 85 percent discount over standard pricing.

I hope this article has provided you with some insight on where to start with Novell Open Enterprise Server for Linux. This and the other two articles in the series have only scratched the surface. But perhaps you've been able to see that it's worth your time to seriously consider putting Novell Open Enterprise Server for Linux into your mix. red N



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