Lab Guide for OES SP2 Linux

IMPORTANT:The Virtual Office product and associated patches are not included in OES SP2.

To use this guide, you must install OES using SP1 software (available for download from the Novell Support Web site). Otherwise, you will not be able to complete the exercises in this guide.

Most organizations test new products in a lab setting prior to making them available for general use.

This guide is designed to help you set up a Novell® Open Enterprise Server (OES) server in a lab environment using a specific and simplified configuration. The configuration is limited in scope and is meant only to acquaint you with OES and provide exposure to the Novell products it contains.

Guide Purposes

The instructions in this guide will help you do the following:

About Information Flow in This Guide

The sections in this guide are designed to be accessed sequentially, guiding you through the following main tasks:

  1. Installing an OES Linux server.
  2. Setting up the eDirectory infrastructure—User objects, Group objects, passwords, etc.
  3. Reviewing the services featured in the guide and performing all additional setup tasks required for test driving and exploring the features.
  4. Test driving and exploring the features.

Using This Guide as a Reference

If you want to install additional OES servers or create a different tree structure than the one specified in this guide, you can still use these instructions as a basic guide for setting up OES services in a lab environment. However, you should also refer to the information found in the following guides:

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Documentation Conventions

In this documentation, a greater-than symbol (>) is used to separate actions within a step and items within a cross-reference path.

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When a single pathname can be written with a backslash for some platforms, or a forward slash for other platforms, the pathname is presented with a forward slash to reflect the Linux convention. Users of platforms that require a backslash, such as NetWare, should use backslashes as required by the software.