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Monitor Memory and Disk Space with Redline 3



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August 7, 2007 5:23 am

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Problem

Some of the most interesting data values of a server are how much memory and disk space is available. If there is not enough, you need to add more memory or a larger disk drive. Sometimes it happens that you run out of memory or disk space, and you need to react immediately.

Solution

With the upcoming Redline 3.0SP1, I’ve added memory and disk space monitoring for all platforms (Linux, NetWare, Windows). You can also draw really nice graphs that show how the memory or disk space has changed during the last day/week/month/year.

This is very easy to set up:

1. Browse to Configure and select Graphs in the menu.

2. Choose Host and select the values “Memory Free” and “Total Memory” for the Memory Graph. That way it is easy to see how much memory is available compared to the total memory installed.

3. For the first Partition – Volume SYS or Drive C – choose the “1st Available Disk Space” and “1st Partition/Volume Size”.

That way you can calculate when you need new Hardware in advance as well. Check how much disk space is used every month, and now you can easily calculate how many months you can work with that server before you need a hardware upgrade.

For more Uli Neumann Tips on Redline 3, see:
http://www.gwavanation.com/user/631/track

For more information about Redline 3, visit:
http://www.gwava.com/products/redline_overview.php

Redline 3 Demo Server:
http://redline.gwava.com/

For more information about other GWAVA products, see:
http://www.GWAVA.com

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Disclaimer: This content is not supported by Novell. It was contributed by a community member and is published "as is." It seems to have worked for at least one person, and might work for you. But please be sure to test it thoroughly before using it in a production environment.

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