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Novell Open Enterprise Server 2 SP1 Is Here!

KariWoolf

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December 16, 2008 4:28 pm

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If you’ve been waiting for the first service pack to deploy Novell Open Enterprise Server 2, now’s the time to make the move. With Novell Open Enterprise Server 2 SP1, you’ll not only get server virtualization, Dynamic Storage Technology and other innovative capabilities from the initial release, you’ll get the following additional features designed to increase simplicity and interoperability.

  • Domain Services for Windows, enabling secure cross-authentication between eDirectory and Active Directory
  • Support for Common Internet File System (CIFS) and Apple Filing Protocol (AFP), delivering streamlined interoperability with Windows and Mac clients
  • iFolder 3.7, supporting groups and multiple iFolders, with enhanced clients for Mac and Linux
  • 64-bit eDirectory
  • An integrated GUI to streamline migrations from NetWare to Linux

To learn more, visit http://www.novell.com/oes. You’ll find information on the new product features, access to eval software, and helpful resources like Novell Open Audio podcasts, upcoming events you can attend, and much more.

Novell Open Enterprise Server 2 is bringing significant cost savings and efficiencies to organizations just like yours. And with the first service pack, you have even more compelling reasons to upgrade. Download the eval and see how you can begin taking advantage of greater simplicity and interoperability today.

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Disclaimer: This content is not supported by Novell. It was contributed by a community member and is published "as is." It seems to have worked for at least one person, and might work for you. But please be sure to test it thoroughly before using it in a production environment.

11 Comments

  1. By:sideshow

    Link doesn’t work

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  2. By:glams

    not a big problem, but currently it’s http://www.novell.com/www.novell.com/oes

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  3. By:coolguys

    Thank you,

    The link is fixed now.

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  4. By:shutchinson

    I guess I’m still confused about what, exactly, “Open Enterprise Server” is.

    The main screen linked to in this article (http://www.novell.com/products/openenterpriseserver/) says

    Open Enterprise Server 2 SP1
    Just like NetWare, only better

    “Open Enterprise Server” has always had two flavors ~ OES (on) Linux and OES (on) NetWare.

    “OES” can mean NW 6.5 + certain SPs, “OES2″ can mean “NW 6.5 + SP7″.

    Yet, the “Compare” page (http://www.novell.com/products/openenterpriseserver/compare.html) “compares” OES1, OES2, NW6.5, NW6.0 and NW5.1 . . .

    So, I ask directly: What, exactly is Open Enterprise Server???

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    • By:rharp61

      I am running Netware 6.5 SP7. Do I need to install SP8 it appears to only setup for a migration to OES. Am I wrong??

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  5. By:Sgermanides

    Open Enterprise Server is a bunch of services (call them utilities, applications) that are bundled together to deliver a variety of storage, print, and networking benefits to customers. The evolution of those services to date has largely been on the NetWare kernel. Today, those services, and powerful new ones, too, deliver the most value to a customer when deployed on Linux.

    Customers never bought NetWare because of the kernel code… they liked what the services on top of the code did for them. Now that Novell is a major player in commercial-Linux, customers can still use their favorite services (that they have used for years on NetWare) but now on Linux, which brings benefits to customers that they could never get w/ Netware — namely more supportability from hardware and third-party software vendors.

    “Open Enterprise Server” has always had two flavors ~ OES (on) Linux and OES (on) NetWare.”

    I believe this is the crux of your question: isn’t OES both NetWare and Linux. YES, but not equally….. All the innovations that have shipped with OES2.0 and OES2 SP1 are only available on Linux. NetWare is still available so that customers can plan how best they will make the move to OES on Linux. We understand that they need to assess and plan for moving workloads. However, we are very confident that anyone who looks at the new services that are only available for deployment on OES-Linux (Dynamic Storage Technology, Domain Services for Windows, virtualization) will want to take advantage of those tools. That’s why we say it’s “just like NetWare, only better.”

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    • By:shutchinson

      Perhaps I’m just a Dinosaur, but I am a firm believer in “If it ain’t broke, don’t mess with it.”

      In that spirit, since Legacy Netware “ain’t broke”, have you considered including as part of OES on Linux …

      … A NetWare-esque CLI front-end to SLES ? (example: Why should I have to remember which init level I need to restart the server versus shutting it down when commands like “restart server” and “shutdown” are so intuitive?) {I can feel the collective GASP of Unix people worldwide. And another because I have the audacity to point out that Linux is just another flavor of Unix.}

      … Building your already “equivalent” utilities (like DSRepair) to have the same look-and-feel as the legacy versions? ie: Make the command-line switches the same and give me an interactive screen so I can see what it’s doing, without having to go hunt down a log.

      … Allowing eDirectory users (with appropriate Admin rights) to login to the SLES console. Or are we just doing something wrong in our shop that we have to login as root?

      … An NLM interpreter (or equivalent) for SLES? (OK, this is probably more complicated than it sounds.)

      These things might ease the transition for your existing customer base. Apart from the NLM interpreter, they don’t seem like they should be hard to accomplish. On the other hand, forcing your existing, loyal, customer base to throw away a substancial part of what we already know and re-learn everything from scratch is not sending the message that you want us to continue using your products.

      Perhaps these features should be optional so existing Unix Users can feel comfortable as well. (If they want to read a log rather than have an interactive screen, let them.)

      Am I asking too much here? Anyone else care to comment either way?

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      • By:netware6guru

        Well, I feel the very same way. I wish that Netware still had a future! – I’ve been supporting it since 1988. So anything Novell can do to integrate the functionality of Netware to the Linux based version – I’m all for it. Funny thing… Unixware never made it, I wonder why? I guess Frankenburg got an earfull that year (circa 1998) trying to introduce a product that resellers really did not want.

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      • By:Shivaji

        Ditto on that.

        I have been using Netware since 2.0A so I am in the dinosaur class too, but the point is it still works!!! I just retired a server which has run all flavors of Netware for the last ten years – a Dell PowerEdge 4350 with a (gasp!!) Pentium III 450 MHz CPU and 2 GB of RAM. Functionally, the folks using it had no problems with it at all. I removed it because it took up 6U of rack space and sucked more power than the three 1U SUN 4650 Opteron servers that replaced it in the rack. The server was migrated into a virtual box on one of the SUN servers without a hiccup.

        GUI interfaces and log files are all very fine, but you cannot, for instance, beat the text mode GroupWise console screens which tell you at a glance exactly what is going on with the system – complete with the spinning heartbeat indicator. I have installed a dozen OES/SLES servers but I have yet to find one that gives you the ease of access and all the features to make migration away from Netware a “must-do” thing. I have had long conversations with Novell Sales folks on this and they have taken copious notes (so they said), but have not seen any indication that it got to anyone’s ear. Now I have an email from Novell Licensing which says in no uncertain terms that Netware has reached End-of-life so we are left with no options.

        Don’t get me wrong – I use Linux everyday, and have half a dozen SLES 10 servers in my data center, but they run web services, Learning Management Systems and so on. My problem is that the steps required to move from Netware to OES/Linux are still not as transparent as it could have been and there are still things that are broken in the Linux side.

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  6. By:lkclp

    Be carefull!!!!!
    Zenworks (ZfD) 7 isn`t working under OES2SP1!!!!!
    After update, ZfD doesn`t work!!!

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  7. By:rdseepaul

    We will be even happier when OES 2 SP2 get here and Novell actually delivers on NSS Filesystem Audit that is equal to what is available for NSS On Netware.

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