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How to Automatically Remove the ZCM 10.0.3 Agent Silently via a Script



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October 24, 2008 6:21 pm

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Problem:

How to automatically remove the ZCM 10.0.3 agent (silently) via a script

Solution:

If you need to remove the 10.0.3 agent via a script (run as a batch file, placed in a login script or GPO in AD), here’s some information you’ll need first.

  1. This assumes that the user logging into the workstation has sufficient rights to remove software
  2. For some reason Novell has hard-coded the ZCM uninstaller to require that the MS Firewall service be ON and Active, during the uninstall. If you’re using a third-party firewall, this assumes that the user on the workstation can stop/start services. If you already use the Windows XP Firewall and it’s running, you don’t need to use the net start and net stop statements.
  3. Your GUID numbers for the CASA and Novell CASA Authentication Token Client may be different.
  4. This also assumes you want to remove the agent from the workstation only via the -c switch. You can use a -h switch to get a list of all the command line switches.

Here’s a batch file I created that will remove the agent silently and then reboot the workstation. This was only tested with ZCM 10.0.3 on Windows XP. It may work with ZCM 10.1, but I would expect the GUID numbers to be different. ZCM 10.1 also does appear to need the Windows Firewall to be active as well (again, for some strange reason).

@echo off
cd "C:\Program files\novell\zenworks\bin"

REM  This starts the Windows XP Firewall Service

net start sharedaccess

REM This removes the ZCM agent from the workstation ONLY.  

zenworksuninstall.exe -c -q

REM This removes the Novell CASA Authentication Token Client

MsiExec.exe /x{E016C7E1-AC80-4C90-9F8B-3EF16ABA2834} /qb!

REM  This removes the CASA Client
MsiExec.exe /x{F5313E94-F17E-4AF6-8E46-6D97ECF4C370} /qb!

REM  This stops the Windows XP Firewall Service
net stop sharedaccess

REM This reboots the workstation with a 30 second countdown

shutdown -r

Example:

@echo off
cd "C:\Program files\novell\zenworks\bin"
net start sharedaccess
zenworksuninstall.exe -c -q
MsiExec.exe /x{E016C7E1-AC80-4C90-9F8B-3EF16ABA2834} /qb!
MsiExec.exe /x{F5313E94-F17E-4AF6-8E46-6D97ECF4C370} /qb!
net stop sharedaccess
shutdown -r

Environment:

Windows XP with the XP Firewall Service shut off (ie, using third party firewall such as Cisco Security Agent)

ZCM 10.0.3

You want to remove the ZCM agent from the workstation only (ie, not remove it from the ZONE). Useful if the ZCM server is not working or no longer in existence anymore.

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Disclaimer: This content is not supported by Novell. It was contributed by a community member and is published "as is." It seems to have worked for at least one person, and might work for you. But please be sure to test it thoroughly before using it in a production environment.

1 Comment

  1. By:Anonymous

    Hello, would this work with Vista Business?

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Futures Day at BrainShare Barcelona



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September 15, 2005 5:14 am

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Today at BrainShare was futures day, with demos on some of the cool upcoming stuff the engineering teams are working on. (Heads up – this is a long post, but I’ll be out on leave this coming week, and wanted to get this up.) With most press, analysts and business reps gone from Barcelona, today was firmly focused on the technical folks. There were five subjects/demos, with Nat Friedman closing out the show with some pretty wild 3-D graphics acceleration stuff on the Linux desktop. Jeff Hawkins, the VP for product development for platforms, was Master of Ceremonies, and did a good job around a soccer- based theme risky for an American in Europe!Taking it from the top: Chris Schlaeger and Robert Wipfel showed some of the new virtualization technologies coming down the pike. The focus is on breaking the connection between the physical machine and the applications and turning physical machines essentially into software objects. Once you do that, you open up all kinds of opportunities for applying policies, leveraging identity and resource management, to allow you to automate data center deployments. Templates for different virtual machines, as well as policies, can be stored in eDirectory, and made available across the network. Chris and Robert demoed migrating a virtual machine from one physical machine to another while running video, without a noticeable interruption. They also demoed running NetWare on a virtual machine. With this technology, you’ll be able to run NetWare and Linux fully virtualized on the same physical machine, picking and choosing the services you want to run. All of this was using Xen and OCFS2.Next up, Martin Buckley talked ZENworks futures. The focus there is on automating compliance. Martin didn’t do any demos, but talked about how the ZEN team is working on integrating ZENworks with AppArmor, the new technology that secures applications on Linux that we got with the Immunix acquisition. By integrating ZEN with AppArmor, you’ll be able to use ZEN to deploy AppArmor out to machines on the network. You’ll also be able to deploy AppArmor profiles as policies via ZENworks, providing both granularity and automation in protecting different parts of the network.Greg Mancusi-Ungaro and Adrian Schroeter walked thru openSUSE.org, highlighting the project’s goal of driving Linux adoption everywhere. Site registrations are close to 5,000, the site wiki is up to 137 pages of content, mostly community contributed, and we’ve had more than 500 bug fixes submitted. We’ll be creating a build server early next year that will expand flexibility for developers, and moving the entire support database onto the site. Erik Dasque talked about Mono momentum and demoed some new features. Mono has 300 active developers, a growing number of apps, and a Kickstart program to help developers get started. It’s being used to write Novell apps like iFolder, as well as Beagle and Banshee (more on these below). To demo Mono, Erik wrote a couple of short Windows apps (including one using ASP.NET), dragged them into iFolder on his Windows machine, pulled the executables out of his iFolder on Linux and ran them, unchanged, on Linux. He also did the same with a Windows mapping application pulled off the Microsoft web site. He created a short app on Linux using Mono, and then ran that on Windows and on the Mac. Finally, using Boo language, he showed how to leverage Mono for interactive real-time application development with no compiling required.Nat Friedman, as usual, didn’t disappoint. He showed several new things he’s working on on the desktop, all focused on improving the end user experience Beagle, the search tool, F-spot for photo management, OpenOffice (demoed by Michael Meeks), Banshee, for music, and XGL, for accelerated and 3-D graphics. Beagle picks up search terms in any available document on the desktop emails, word documents, presentations, images, instant messages, PDF, viewed web page, etc. It’s flexible, so you can filter by document types. It’s dynamic and real time, so documents created with the search term are immediately added to search results, and searches can be bookmarked. It’s designed to help answer the question Now, where did I see that thing? Beagle also lets you search via the command line in Linux, and provides other features that developers can use to tie search into what they’re working on. Micheal Meeks showed some improvements in OpenOffice 2, particularly on the presentation and macros side. You can now use Mono to program in OpenOffice. Nat showed F-spot, the photo organizer on the desktop. It’s got things like a timeline toolbar and tagging to help manage photos. There’s been a lot of work on plug and play. He had Jeff Hawkins take some digital photos on stage. F-spot recognized the camera, and Nat was able to download, tag, file and upload the photos to his website in about 10 seconds. Nat also demoed Banshee, a one-stop shop for digital music needs storing, transferring to iPods, burning CDs, playback, etc. Again, all plug and play.Nat saved the best wow stuff for last, demoing new graphic acceleration and 3-D from the XGL project. He showed wobbly windows as an example of what could be done. He was able to bend windows in 3-D while they were active, including watching a video feed. He also demoed semi-transparent windows, and multiple ways to organize desktop windows. Finally, he showed a new desktop workspace metaphor a three dimensional cube that you rotate to get to a different desktop workspace. He moved his wobbly windows to different workspaces, even curving them around 90 degree angles, all while keep the windows active (including video). Definitely the biggest crowd pleaser…So, that wraps up BrainShare Barcelona 2005.

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Disclaimer: This content is not supported by Novell. It was contributed by a community member and is published "as is." It seems to have worked for at least one person, and might work for you. But please be sure to test it thoroughly before using it in a production environment.

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