Cool Solutions

WorkOrder Details



By:

June 13, 2007 10:19 am

Reads:4,933

Comments:1

Score:Unrated

Introduction

Okay, where did we leave off? Ah yes, I believe we are working with the WorkOrder driver. The order (ha, ha … bad pun) of the day was to get a couple of these beauties working together to manage the beginning and end of a user’s life – but let’s skip the beginning for now (people asking for demos now, not later). Eventually my plan (possibly revised from before) is to get it all into one driver. The developer says this will help things out. He also mentioned efficiency in keeping all WorkOrders for a given driver in their own container, rather than having multiple drivers’ objects per container. So it is possible, but apparently not recommended by people who know things, to have those objects clumped together. Sorry for any misinformation. I’m trying to get this all done properly the first time, but apparently my perfection is wearing thin these days.

So in the previous post (see http://www.novell.com/coolsolutions/feature/19121.html) I gave the example of how this could be used when a user is created, having them enabled a couple weeks later when they officially started work or school. The other example was of a user being terminated for one reason or another. Setting their “loginDisabled” attribute to TRUE should take care of them, but maybe deletion should not be done right away for some kind of legal/compliance reason. Working around this is what we’ll demonstrate today, with disturbing amounts of detail. As one mentor of mine likes to say, “I hear and I forget; I see and I remember; I do and I understand.” As we work through this, do it on your own as well. This is a free driver that comes with a product that has a 90-day evaluation and can run on eDirectory (no license required for this kind of thing) on Linux (again, free). You can even use various tools for the setup that aren’t command-line tools, like iManager and Designer – which are both $10,000,000,000 per CD at AB’s Shopping center (comes with setup and technical support) – but free if you get them online.

Driver Background

So let’s move on to the driver. I’m including the export of my current driver (testWO-0) with this entry for any who are wanting to use it directly. All examples will be from this example with its current policies. Importing the preconfigured driver is as simple as almost any other driver, although unless you name your driver ?WorkOrder? (case-sensitive), you must change a few things after the fact. With my first shot I did not name my driver “WorkOrder”, and it was a good learning experience, so I’ll be passing that all along. To start with, let’s import a default driver and look at the options in there.

Actually, let’s start at the very beginning, a very good place to start. For this walk-through I’m using Mobile/Workstation iManager 2.6 SP3 with the IDM 3.5 plug-ins. The same driver import can be done with Designer with a few differences, but those should be fairly minimal.

Getting Started

1. Open iManager.

2. Log in as somebody with power/rights.

3. Choose Identity Manager > Identity Manager Overview.

4. Search for a DriverSet in your tree.

If you don’t have one, go ahead and create one. If you just created a DriverSet, you’ll be prompted to import a driver configuration. If not, click Add Driver and then choose the WorkOrder-IDM3_5_0_V1.xml file. This is the driver preconfig that has the default settings in it.

5. Moving to the next screen, rename the driver to testWO-0 (case-sensitive for these examples).

6. Choose a container for WorkOrder objects.

Tree Organization

At this point I need to explain my tree a little bit.

Many people will organize their trees by hierarchy or geography, which is a great model to follow. There are some problems that arise with these models, though, such as where to put things that aren’t people. Where do servers go? Where do printers go? Where do IDM objects and DriverSets go? IDM especially does not do better or worse when placed geographically, and most of the time neither do non-users/groups, at least in my limited experience.

With this in mind, my tree tries to work around all that. At the root of my tree. instead of an Organization, I have Security along with two domains (DC) called “org” and “system”. The “system” domain contains everything that isn’t a human or group, and “org” contains all of my organizations (“novell”, “suse”, etc.). Having multiple Organizations underneath this common non-Tree object is really nice with IDM because you have a starting place for various queries that is not the Tree object. Rights can be assigned without affecting servers through inheritance, so life is generally good. Underneath the Organizations it’s fairly typical and broken down by whatever is best (geography, company hierarchy, etc.).

On the “system” side is where the beauty lies. Under “system” are “user”, “service”, and “server” Domains. Under “server” is a container (Domain) for each server in the tree (named the same as the server instance), which holds all of the server-related objects. Underneath “service” is a Domain for each service in my tree, including “lum”, “idm”, “rbs”, “mail”, and whatever else I throw in there. Finally, under “idm” are all of my IDM-related objects, including DriverSets, Organizational Roles (from which drivers receive their privileges), and for this driver the various WorkOrder and WorkToDo containers. See another article later on for more benefits of the tree design.

1853-1.png

So with this driver import, my containers are the following:

  • dc=testwo-0workorder
  • dc=idm
  • dc=service
  • dc=system and dc=testwo-0worktodo
  • dc=idm
  • dc=service
  • dc=system

These containers are where the physical WorkOrder and WorkToDo objects will live in eDirectory while waiting for processing, or after completing all processing and waiting for deletion or administrator action. Note that the import actually wants these in dot notation and not LDAP format as I’m specifying them (for simplicity understanding the levels).

Continuing the Import

1. Leave the default polling method as “By Interval” – which is great for this test.

2. Set the Driver Heartbeat to “No”, because we don’t need it at this point. We’ll also be running this driver locally.

3. On the next screen, enter a polling interval in minutes. In real life this should probably be something like 60, but in this example we’ll use a value from one to five (your choice).

4. On the next screen, define the driver’s security equivalence.

I created an Organizational Role called “cn=testwo-0defaultdrvrset35,dc=idm,dc=service,dc=system” specifically for this driver. It was given supervisor to Entry rights to a container under my suse Organization (cn=testwo-0,o=suse,dc=org) and the same for the WorkOrder and WorkToDo containers specified earlier on. In a production environment the Organizational Role may need rights to more of the tree. But I do lots of testing, so having things with rights assigned all over just for kicks leads to anomalies that are a pain to troubleshoot. Be sure to exclude administrative accounts. Having granular rights assignments and good tree design minimizes the impact of forgetting this step (my admin accounts are all separate under dc=user,dc=system) but excluding your own user is always a good idea when testing.

5. Complete the import.

At this point a driver should be in the tree with the start option of Manual. If you are using the import I’ve included, the start option is set to Disabled so you don’t inadvertently cache events. As with any IDM driver, the TAO file caches events if the driver is in Manual or Auto-Start mode but not running, or when running but not keeping up with the incoming work load.

Working with the Driver Properties

1. Open the driver properties for this driver.

First on the screen should be the driver class of “com.novell.nds.dirxml.driver.workorder.WorkOrderDriverShim”. The next few fields are, as far as I can tell, not really used. Like the Loopback driver this doesn’t have an application against which it needs to authenticate, so the Driver Object and Application passwords don’t do anything. Similarly, the authentication ID and context don’t do anything (I have no idea why they have values in them by default but, as in most things XML, extra doesn’t hurt).

Below the Startup Options are some Publisher Settings. My Work Order Objects DN is “system\service\idm\testwo-0workorder”, the Poll Interval (minutes) is 5, Poll Time is blank, and “Heartbeat on” is “No”. Feel free to look around the rest of the options here, as most things are fairly standard. A lot of fields are not present here, because that is the nature of the driver.

2. Go to “Misc” and set the trace level to 3.

3. Write the trace file to something like “/var/opt/novell/idm/testwo-0/trace.log” after running

mkdir -p /var/opt/novell/idm/testwo-0

on your server or creating the appropriate directory structure some other way. Be sure to change these back before going into production, but for now, having the trace ready will probably help more than hinder.

4. Finish up in the driver properties screen.

Working with the Driver Overview

1. Move to the Driver Overview by clicking on the driver object itself. You should now be at the “fishbone” diagram, with both the Subscriber and Publisher channels shown.

Here we are going to make some slight modifications.

2. Choose the Filter and add the User class and, underneath that, the Login Disabled attribute.

3. Set the class to Synchronize and the attribute to Notify on the Subscriber channel, leaving the Publisher set to Ignore for both class and attribute. The WorkOrder and WorkToDo classes should already be there correctly.

Notice that no Event Transformation policyset is included, nor is there any Matching policyset. There’s nothing to match here, so of course that’s gone. The Creation policyset has one simple rule that verifies any WorkOrders coming in via the Subscriber channel are valid, with all required attributes present.

Placement Policyset

Moving along to the Placement policyset is some important stuff that you MUST change for things to work currently. As the default driver was set up, the placement policy looks like it will put WorkOrder objects in some \WorkOrder container with the name of the object moving through. This is not really the case, and it can be a cause for confusion – so don’t let it do that. The Placement policy simply marks the object with the driver name (case-sensitive) and then the name of the WorkOrder object in the channel (which can be anything unique to that container where WorkOrder objects go). So, if you had not renamed your driver, it would be named “WorkOrder”, and the placement policy of \WorkOrder\Source Name() would work properly. However, the instructions were to rename the driver to testWO-0, so now things would not work, and you would get a nasty error in the trace about how you have “No Destination DN”. Right before that shows up, the trace actually tries to help you know what is expected, so that was a nice addition from the developer.

For some fun, let’s look at a trace with the following data in it:

[05/02/07 17:19:01.474]:testWO-0 ST:Submitting document to subscriber shim:
[05/02/07 17:19:01.477]:testWO-0 ST:
<nds dtdversion=?3.5″ ndsversion=?8.x?>
<source>
<product version=?3.5.0.20070315 ?>DirXML</product>
<contact>Novell, Inc.</contact>
</source>
<input>
<add class-name=?WorkOrder? dest-dn=?system\service\idm\testwo-0workorder\wotest06″ event-id=?idm0lin-1a#20070502231901#1#2″>
<add-attr attr-name=?Description?>
<value type=?string?>\IDM0TREE\org\suse\testwo-0\test06</value>
</add-attr>
<add-attr attr-name=?Content?>
<value type=?string?>\IDM0TREE\org\suse\testwo-0\test06</value>
</add-attr>
<add-attr attr-name=?DueDate?>
<value type=?string?>1185707941</value>
</add-attr>
<add-attr attr-name=?DeleteDueDate?>
<value type=?string?>1185707941</value>
</add-attr>
</add>
</input>
</nds>
[05/02/07 17:19:01.494]:testWO-0 ST:##WorkOrder Sub ??:: WOSubscriptionShimm execute
[05/02/07 17:19:01.496]:testWO-0 ST:##WorkOrder Sub ??:: commandClass = class com.novell.nds.dirxml.driver.xds.XDSAddElement
[05/02/07 17:19:01.498]:testWO-0 ST:##WorkOrder Sub ??:: WOSubscriptionShim addHandler driverDN = \testWO-0\Object DN =system\service\idm\testwo-0workorder\wotest06
[05/02/07 17:19:01.502]:testWO-0 ST:SubscriptionShim.execute() returned:
[05/02/07 17:19:01.503]:testWO-0 ST:
<nds dtdversion=?2.0″>
<source>
<product build=?20070301_0812″ instance=?testWO-0″ version=?3.5″>DirXML WorkOrder Driver (Java)</product>
<contact>Novell, Inc.</contact>
</source>
<output>
<status event-id=?idm0lin-1a#20070502231901#1#2″ level=?error? type=?driver-general?>
<description>No Destination DN</description>
</status>
</output>
</nds>

So we can see that this is the end of the document’s life on the Subscriber channel. It is off to the shim, and it has a dest-dn that I ever-so-cleverly set to where my WorkOrder objects should go. The only problem is that I didn’t understand what was going on at all. The trace shows what is wrong at 17:19:01.498. It states “driverDN=\testWO-0\Object” and then lists the actual DN, which is “system\service\idm\testwo-0workorder\wotest06″. The part about driverDN is what it wants, only with something unique in the place of “Object”. So here we have worked past our first error that would probably catch most people new to the WorkOrder driver, for a fair chunk of time. It’s not very intuitive at all, but if I hadn’t wanted some naming scheme for this driver it wouldn’t have happened. We’ll see what happens to this object on the Publisher side.

Command Transformation Policyset

Now that we’re past the placement policy, the next thing to do is to get to the Command Transformation policyset. This is an important place for our driver because, as you may recall, the idea is to

  • Have a WorkOrder created when a user is disabled
  • Cause the WorkOrder to be used after a period of time
  • Delete the user who was disabled

We have allowed the User object into the channel, but we still don’t have a WorkOrder. It will be created in the Command Transformation policyset.

Note that a lot of the code to do this is actually in the WorkOrder driver documentation. One of the links with code doesn’t open very nicely in a browser that bothers to verify the XML. but the files do work and can be viewed if you go after the source from the browser or save them directly to your system.

The first policy in the policyset creates the WorkOrder from the user synchronizing through.

<?xml version=?1.0″ encoding=?UTF-8″?><policy xmlns:jdate=?http://www.novell.com/nxsl/java/java.util.Date? xmlns:jformat=?http://www.novell.com/nxsl/java/java.text.SimpleDateFormat?>
<rule>
<description>Convert User object Add to Work Order object add</description>
<conditions>
<and>
<if-operation op=?equal?>add</if-operation>
<if-class-name op=?equal?>User</if-class-name>
<if-op-attr name=?Login Disabled? op=?changing-to?>TRUE</if-op-attr>
</and>
</conditions>
<actions>
<do-set-local-variable name=?order-dest-dn?>
<arg-string>
<token-text xml:space=?preserve?>\testWO-0\</token-text>
<token-src-name/>
</arg-string>
</do-set-local-variable>
<do-add-dest-object class-name=?DirXML-WorkOrder? when=?after?>
<arg-dn>
<token-local-variable name=?order-dest-dn?/>
</arg-dn>
</do-add-dest-object>
<do-add-dest-attr-value class-name=?DirXML-WorkOrder? name=?Description? when=?after?>
<arg-dn>
<token-local-variable name=?order-dest-dn?/>
</arg-dn>
<arg-value type=?string?>
<token-src-dn/>
</arg-value>
</do-add-dest-attr-value>
<do-add-dest-attr-value class-name=?DirXML-WorkOrder? name=?DirXML-nwoContent? when=?after?>
<arg-dn>
<token-local-variable name=?order-dest-dn?/>
</arg-dn>
<arg-value type=?string?>
<token-src-dn/>
</arg-value>
</do-add-dest-attr-value>
<do-add-dest-attr-value class-name=?DirXML-WorkOrder? name=?DirXML-DueDate? when=?after?>
<arg-dn>
<token-local-variable name=?order-dest-dn?/>
</arg-dn>
<arg-value type=?string?>
<token-xpath expression=?round(jdate:getTime(jdate:new()) div 1000)+60″/>
</arg-value>
</do-add-dest-attr-value>
<do-add-dest-attr-value class-name=?DirXML-WorkOrder? name=?DirXML-nwoDeleteDueDate? when=?after?>
<arg-dn>
<token-local-variable name=?order-dest-dn?/>
</arg-dn>
<arg-value type=?string?>
<token-xpath expression=?round(jdate:getTime(jdate:new()) div 1000)+21600″/>
</arg-value>
</do-add-dest-attr-value>
<do-veto/>
</actions>
</rule>
</policy>

This first policy works for add events for objects of the User class that have a loginDisabled attribute changing to TRUE. Once that is established, the following things happen:

  • A new object is created with a proper dest-dn (see previous paragraphs).
  • A DirXML-DueDate is set to one minute from the current time. (When the WorkOrder will be processed on the Publisher channel, one minute isn’t the most-practical example but it does lend itself to faster testing.)
  • Description and DirXML-nwoContent attributes are set, which both happen to have the DN of the original user object in them (for use later).
  • A DirXML-DeleteDueDate is set to 6 hours in the future.
  • A veto of the original User-add event is set.

So, the end document is a full DirXML-WorkOrder object with the required attributes set to process in one minute and to be deleted in six hours. So far, so good.

The next policy makes the DirXML-WorkOrder object complete by adding a source DN (src-dn) as well as the object’s first status of “pending”, which is important. The publisher polling that takes place every few minutes looks for WorkOrders of different types. A pending WorkOrder is ready to be worked on immediately, assuming the DueDate has been reached. Another status is “error”, which means the WorkOrder will not be processed until somebody intervenes; or, the driver will delete them if the driver is set to delete erring WorkOrders. Anyway, it’s a tangent I don’t want to explore right now – but just keep the status in mind.

The next policy in the Command Transformation policyset follows:

<?xml version=?1.0″ encoding=?UTF-8″?><policy>
<rule>
<description>Set Synthesized WorkOrders Source DN</description>
<conditions>
<and>
<if-operation op=?equal?>add</if-operation>
<if-class-name op=?equal?>DirXML-WorkOrder</if-class-name>
<if-src-dn op=?not-available?/>
</and>
</conditions>
<actions>
<do-set-op-src-dn>
<arg-dn>
<token-attr name=?Description?/>
</arg-dn>
</do-set-op-src-dn>
<do-add-dest-attr-value class-name=?DirXML-WorkOrder? name=?DirXML-nwoSendToPublisher?>
<arg-value type=?string?>
<token-text xml:space=?preserve?>true</token-text>
</arg-value>
</do-add-dest-attr-value>
<do-add-dest-attr-value class-name=?DirXML-WorkOrder? name=?DirXML-nwoStatus?>
<arg-value type=?string?>
<token-text xml:space=?preserve?>pending</token-text>
</arg-value>
</do-add-dest-attr-value>
</actions>
</rule>
</policy>

So we can see that if src-dn is not available, one is added. The src-dn that is assigned is the one from the User that started this whole mess. Also, the DirXML-nwoSendToPublisher is set to true, so this document will be sent to the publisher. What does that mean specifically? When a subscriber WorkOrder is “sent to the publisher” it means it is written to the container you specified way back in the beginning. If we also added a rule that said “DoItNow=TRUE”, the Publisher would also fire up and process all WorkOrders, but that’s not the case for us now. (It doesn’t make much sense to do that, since we’re planning on everything happening in one minute, not immediately, and this would probably be set to do things in thirty to ninety days in a production system).

That’s it for the Subscriber channel.

Publisher Placement Policyset

We have told the new WorkOrder to go to eDirectory, where it is waiting for some kind of action from the Publisher channel’s polling. That polling is where more fun takes place. Looking at that channel you may have noticed it is quite sparse. There is nothing populated except for the Schema Mapping policyset and the Placement policyset. Let’s skip over to the Placement policyset and see how mine has changed slightly from the default.

<;?xml version=?1.0″ encoding=?UTF-8″?><;policy>
<;rule>
<;description>Work Order Placement<;/description>
<;conditions>
<;and>
<;if-class-name op=?equal?>DirXML-WorkOrder<;/if-class-name>
<;if-src-dn op=?in-subtree? xml:space=?preserve?>\WorkOrder\<;/if-src-dn>
<;if-src-dn op=?not-equal? xml:space=?preserve?>\WorkOrder\<;/if-src-dn>
<;/and>
<;/conditions>
<;actions>
<;do-set-op-dest-dn>
<;arg-dn>
<;token-text xml:space=?preserve?>system\service\idm\testwo-0workorder<;/token-text>
<;token-text xml:space=?preserve?>\<;/token-text>
<;token-src-name/>
<;/arg-dn>
<;/do-set-op-dest-dn>
<;do-break/>
<;/actions>
<;/rule>
<;rule>
<;description>Work Order To Do Placement<;/description>
<;conditions>
<;and>
<;if-class-name op=?equal?>DirXML-WorkToDo<;/if-class-name>
<;if-src-dn op=?in-subtree?>\WorkOrder\<;/if-src-dn>
<;/and>
<;/conditions>
<;actions>
<;do-set-op-dest-dn>
<;arg-dn>
<;token-text xml:space=?preserve?>system\service\idm\testwo-0worktodo<;/token-text>
<;token-text xml:space=?preserve?>\<;/token-text>
<;token-src-name/>
<;/arg-dn>
<;/do-set-op-dest-dn>
<;do-break/>
<;/actions>
<;/rule>
<;/policy>

The first rule should catch your attention. It has that pesky driver name in there again. We have already modified the placement policy for WorkOrders on the Subscriber side to have the correct driver name, and we should do the same here – otherwise, anything coming back from the shim on its way to be written in eDirectory will fail. The first rule is designed to give WorkOrder objects a valid placement policy in eDirectory. This path came straight from the preconfig back in the beginning when we were asked for it, which is why it has that in there already. With the proper conditional statements, WorkOrders can now safely make it into the holding cell in eDirectory.

The second rule is geared toward the WorkToDo objects that come from the polling cycles that the driver is set to do already. As a WorkOrder object is brought in from eDirectory, it is made into a WorkToDo object containing the same attributes that the original WorkOrder object contained. It is this object that will cause all the fun to happen after the user has been disabled for thirty to ninety days (or one minute in our case).

Note that the Publisher is polling regularly for objects whose DirXML-DueDate attribute is in the past. When that time is in the past, and the polling cycle runs, and the object is “pending”, it is processed. So after the period of time, the Publisher Placement policyset eventually ends up with this object. By default, it puts it in the WorkToDo container specified back when you originally set up the driver. This is fine, but it doesn’t do anything for anybody. It is possible you could then have other drivers act on objects created in this container. You could also write scripts or applications in other languages that watched this container for additions and did things based on those additions. In this case, as this is a simple example, we’ll just delete the object of the user who was disabled. What follows is the Publisher Placement policy from my driver. Granted, I have hacked it up a little because I didn’t know exactly what I was doing in the beginning, but it still works nicely. Most of the hacking seems to be on the conditions for the placement policy for WorkOrder objects, not WorkToDo objects.

<?xml version=?1.0″ encoding=?UTF-8″?><policy>
<rule>
<description>Work Order Placement</description>
<conditions>
<and>
<if-class-name op=?equal?>DirXML-WorkOrder</if-class-name>
<!? <if-src-dn op=?in-subtree? xml:space=?preserve?>\WorkOrder\</if-src-dn>
<if-src-dn op=?not-equal? xml:space=?preserve?>\WorkOrder\</if-src-dn> ?>
</and>
</conditions>
<actions>
<do-set-op-dest-dn>
<arg-dn>
<token-text xml:space=?preserve?>system\service\idm\testwo-0workorder</token-text>
<token-text xml:space=?preserve?>\</token-text>
<token-src-name/>
</arg-dn>
</do-set-op-dest-dn>
<do-break/>
</actions>
</rule>
<rule disabled=?true? notrace=?true?>
<description>Work Order To Do Placement</description>
<conditions>
<and>
<if-class-name op=?equal?>DirXML-WorkToDo</if-class-name>
<if-src-dn op=?in-subtree?>\testWO-0\</if-src-dn>
</and>
</conditions>
<actions>
<do-set-op-dest-dn>
<arg-dn>
<token-text xml:space=?preserve?>system\service\idm\testwo-0worktodo</token-text>
<token-text xml:space=?preserve?>\</token-text>
<token-src-name/>
</arg-dn>
</do-set-op-dest-dn>
<do-break/>
</actions>
</rule>
<rule>
<description>Work Order To Do Placement</description>
<conditions>
<and>
<if-class-name op=?equal?>DirXML-WorkToDo</if-class-name>
<if-src-dn op=?in-subtree?>\testWO-0\</if-src-dn>
</and>
</conditions>
<actions>
<do-set-op-dest-dn disabled=?true? notrace=?true?>
<arg-dn>
<token-text xml:space=?preserve?>system\service\idm\testwo-0worktodo</token-text>
<token-text xml:space=?preserve?>\</token-text>
<token-src-name/>
</arg-dn>
</do-set-op-dest-dn>
<do-delete-dest-object direct=?true?>
<arg-dn>
<token-op-attr name=?DirXML-nwoContent?/>
</arg-dn>
</do-delete-dest-object>
<do-veto/>
</actions>
</rule>
</policy>

So what is happening is that I have commented out some conditions for WorkOrder object placement. This doesn’t have much effect, since I left the one condition to be sure it was a WorkOrder object, and I only have WorkOrders coming from one location. The second rule is a disabled original rule for WorkToDo objects with tracing turned off. I prefer to disable rules that I don’t use rather than removing them, because I make a fair number of mistakes, and it’s faster re-enabling than it is re-creating.

The final rule is the one that finishes off “dead” users. If the source DN (src-dn) is correct, and if the class is correct, then normally the dest-dn is set properly so the WorkToDo object can go out to eDirectory. That action is disabled, though, and instead a new action exists. This action tells IDM to (directly) delete the object whose DN is stored in the DirXML-nwoContent attribute of the WorkToDo object. As you may recall, we set that to the original user’s DN way back in the first Command Transformation policy on the Subscriber channel. The last action is to veto the current event, because I didn’t want to fill my tree with WorkToDo objects. This could be allowed to proceed as long as there was a valid dest-dn (the other action I disabled).

As the polling picked up the WorkOrder and turned it into a WorkToDo object, the Status changed to Configured (as I recall). Also, more notes were written to the initial WorkOrder object about the status of everything taking place. The ProcessLog attribute has this log built into it, and the driver writes to it automatically. This is a neat little audit of this particular WorkOrder’s events. The WorkOrder should be around for another five hours fifty-nine minutes (give or take a minute) so you should be able to see things in there. You could also probably write rules to add notes in there directly, with your own custom logic. Hands-free auditing of each event could be very helpful.

Now there is a significant amount of potential for this driver in the DirXML-nwoContent and other attributes. Many of them haven’t been covered at all in these blog posts, because they aren?t essential – but don’t limit yourself for just that reason. Knowing the basics will get you going, but there is more to be done. For example, making a driver do multiple things should be as simple as including something in the WorkOrder and/or WorkToDo object that has an action. For example, we didn’t tell this driver to do the delete – it was just programmed to only delete disabled user objects. It should be trivial to put an action of some kind in Description (“add”, “enable”, “reset password”, “changeGivenNameTo”, etc.), upon which you could base a lot of logic. The Placement policyset could have a dozen different rules for different types of events that came through, so this WorkOrder driver could handle dozens or hundreds of different types of regular activities. Entire XDS operation documents could be included and executed from a WorkOrder object.

Scalability and Test Environment

So that leads me to scalability. What happens when you want to use this in an educational environment where users are added and removed each year, or group memberships based on a class schedule are changed every semester/quarter? How long does it take for 1,000 WorkOrders to be processed? A commenter to my previous post asked that, and I did a humble test with the driver we just went through. The test was to create 10,000 users in the container and then to disable the logins. Those disabled logins caused 10,000 WorkOrder objects to be created and, after the creates of those events was complete, the polling interval fired off (twenty minutes later) and took care of deleting the original user objects. Less than six hours later, all of the WorkOrder objects were also automatically deleted.

A note regarding my environment is due. I am running three servers. One Optiplex GX1 500 MHz server with 512 MB RAM is running Linux OES SP2 with eDirectory 8.8.1 and IDM 3.0.1 (not running this driver though, obviously). Another Dell desktop (one of those thin skinny things that goes under the monitor) with a 667 MHz processor and 512 MB RAM is running SLES 10, eDirectory 8.8.1, Security Services 2.0.4 (SS204) and IDM 3.5 with the WorkOrder driver that did all this work. The import and disabling of logins were both done via LDAP with the “user.pl” script (a Cool Solution on Novell’s website). A third Dell workstation was also in the mix with eDirectory 8.8.1 and two instances of eDirectory, both in this same tree. So even with old hardware and four replicas (of the entire tree) spread out, this test ran and impressed me a bit.

The test of creating 20K objects (10K users, 10K WorkOrders), polling for objects, modifying the WorkOrders, and deleting the users took about one hour and forty minutes. This included replication to all other instances of eDirectory in the tree (the other three) across my awesome 10 Mbit hub. Granted the poor little desktop was really working hard during that time period, and I probably should have disabled the trace file to help, but it all finished rather nicely. I had a hiccup at the beginning because I had my DeleteDueDate set to five minutes. The problem with this is that the WorkOrder objects weren’t finished being created within those five minutes. So once they were finished, the Polling took place and found all those expired WorkOrders and deleted them, without taking care of the processing that would have deleted the original User objects. This is why you do testing, why you use better hardware, and why you don’t decide to delete disabled users immediately. It was a good learning experience in logic errors and timing issues, if nothing else.

Conclusion

Now with all this under your belt and with a decent understanding of all things WorkOrder, it is probably a good time to go read the documentation. Please provide suggestions in there to improve it. This driver is not terribly (in my opinion) intuitive to veteran IDM engineers, and having some content in there that would help bridge the understanding would be great for all.

Any questions?

The driver mentioned in the post follows. It is a GZipped XML driver export. With the .gz extension, most compression utilities should have no problem opening it. Linux has utilities to do so built in. For those on Windows please use something like 7-Zip or WinZip or some other freeware with this built in.

GZipped Driver Export

0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5 (0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5)
You need to be a registered member to rate this post.
Loading ... Loading ...

Categories: Uncategorized

Disclaimer: This content is not supported by Novell. It was contributed by a community member and is published "as is." It seems to have worked for at least one person, and might work for you. But please be sure to test it thoroughly before using it in a production environment.

1 Comment

  1. By:Anonymous

    can you please rectify the link for the sample driver in the gz format. the link given above is not working. it will be very helpful to look at the complete driver export following the nice explanation you have provided here.

    thanks a lot – edir4ever.

    –edir

Comment

RSS