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Using MACFILE.NLM

(Last modified: 08Nov1995)

This document (1006756) is provided subject to the disclaimer at the end of this document.

Symptom

What is macfile.nlm? How do I use it?

Solutions

MACFILE.NLM should be loaded on any server that will be accessed by Mac OS-based workstations. It is used with the IPX/NCP macintosh client.

MACFILE.NLM uses console load line parameters and set commands to set options. The set commands are available only after MACFILE.NLM is loaded.

Install MACFILE.NLM on the server if any of the following situations apply:

1. Mac OS users want to store Mac OS-compatible applications or files on the server.
2. Users want to add comments to server-based files and directories.
3. Users want to put server-based items in the Trash rather than irrevocably deleting them.
4. System administrators want to customize NetWare volume names for Mac OS users.

You can obtain more information about how to use MACFILE.NLM and its commands and parameters at any time after MACFILE is loaded by typing the following command at the server console (or from a Mac OS-based workstation using the Remote Console utility):

     macfile help

Information about Mac OS-compatible applications on a NetWare volume is stored in the desktop database. From time to time, it might become necessary to rebuild or reset the desktop. For example, the desktop database might be incomplete or corrupt.

It is important to note the difference between a desktop rebuild and a desktop reset. A rebuild adds new information to the existing desktop database. A reset deletes the existing desktop database and creates a new one.

A reset throws away all icons, then rebuilds the desktop database. Users cannot see icons that have not yet been restored to the database while the reset is running.

There is no easy way to tell whether the database is incomplete or corrupt from either the client or on the server. The most likely situation in which you should rebuild the database is when you perform large copy operations, such as restoring files from a backup using an application other than the Apple Finder. For example, if you restore the files from a DOS workstation, you should rebuild the desktop database.

Symptoms that the desktop database may be incomplete or corrupt include visually damaged icons, failure to launch an application that is on the volume when its document is double-clicked, and the absence of icons that belong to applications on the volume.

However, there can be many other causes of damaged icons and of failure to launch an application; further, the absence of icons could occur under normal conditions due to caching of default icons for an application by the Finder.

To rebuild the desktop database, enter this command line at the server console (or use Remote Console from a Mac OS-based workstation):

     rebuild macintosh desktop on {volume name}

NOTE: The volume name you enter is the NetWare volume name, not the Mac OS volume name

This command rebuilds the Mac OS desktop on the specified volume by adding to the existing desktop database.

To reset the desktop database, enter this command line at the server console (or use Remote Console from a Mac OS-based workstation):

     reset macintosh desktop on {volume name}

This command resets the Mac OS desktop on the specified volume by deleting the existing desktop database and rebuilding it.

When some versions of AFP.NLM are loaded, the desktop database is periodically automatically rebuilt to include information from AFP. You can set the amount of time you want to pass between each rebuild.

If MACFILE.NLM is not loaded, enter this command at the server console (or use Remote Console from a Mac OS-based workstation):

     load macfile freq={time in seconds}

If MACFILE.NLM is already loaded, enter this command at the server console (or use Remote Console from a Mac OS-based workstation):

     set interval between macintosh desktop rebuilds={time}

The time variable enables you to determine the interval. The default time frame is seconds, so if you type "1" in place of the time variable, the interval is set to 1 second. You can use other time frames. For example, if you want to have two days pass between rebuilds, replace the time variable with "2 days."

You can set the time to 0 to prevent rebuilds; or, you can specify a time parameter from one second to 365 days. If you do not enter any time parameter, the interval is automatically set to one day.

At times it might be necessary to delete the desktop database and start over again. This is especially helpful if the desktop database has grown too large.

To delete the desktop database, enter this command line at the server console (or use Remote Console from a Mac OS-based workstation):

     delete macintosh desktop on {volume name}

MACFILE.NLM enables you to specify a Macintosh-style name for a volume with the Macintosh name space. To specify a volume name, use the following console command:

     macintosh volume name for {volume name} {={Macintosh name}}

If the Macintosh name variable is absent, the current Mac OS-style volume name is displayed. If there is no current volume name, a message displays, telling you that there is no name.

The name change takes effect immediately, but will not be seen by users until they remount the volume on their workstations. It will not appear in the NetWare Directory Browser, NetWare Volume Mounter, or MACFILE.NLM.

To delete a Mac OS-style volume name, set the NetWare volume name in all uppercase letters. For example:

     macintosh volume name for public=PUBLIC

disclaimer

The Origin of this information may be internal or external to Novell. Novell makes all reasonable efforts to verify this information. However, the information provided in this document is for your information only. Novell makes no explicit or implied claims to the validity of this information.
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